Relocation Guide

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Making games is a global phenomenon

Whether you’re a grad just starting out or a veteran industry professional, taking care of your career can often mean taking the step to change town, city or even country. The more open you are on location the broader the choice of role which enables you to pick the best move for your career. 

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Imagine

Google the location and picture the scene, choose a culture and design the lifestyle you want. Think about what you like to do both in and outside of work; would cool bars or relaxed café-culture be your thing? Art galleries or extreme sports? Urban chic or country air? Don’t forget the culture of the studio too. The right working environment can be hugely empowering.


Plan

Get practical and do some research. Logistics around living costs, travel, taxes, holidays, weather, accommodation etc. all add up. Review your finances to see how much you need to earn to support your lifestyle. Sometimes countries with the highest taxes and living costs actually offer the highest standards of living with benefits such as free lunches, great schools or long holidays, so take things on balance of what’s important to you.


Brave

Taking the plunge on relocation is a big step, but take the pressure off a little. Some people move towns or countries many times in their career, while others give it a go and then make their way back home when the time is right. It’s a matter of perspective but for most people, calling on a little bit of courage to make a change at least once in a working life brings a huge amount of growth, experience and fulfilment.

Talk

Who’s coming with you and who would you be leaving? Friends, kids, parents etc, it’s your decision of course but be cautious of springing surprises on people who will be directly affected by your move. Early discussions mean you can address things you might not have thought of and make for a smoother transition. 


Talk to your recruitment consultant too, chances are they have helped many people in exactly your position and have a strong understanding of what you’re going through. Pick their brains and get the benefit of this experience and get any concerns off your chest. They might even be able to put you in touch with others they have placed there.


Career

Ultimately, if you’re going to the trouble of moving it should benefit your career. With location unrestricted you get to decide freely which projects appeal to you, what role you’d be happiest in and where this move could take your career in the future. 


Talk to your consultant about your aspirations and be open about what you want in your next move. We can’t promise your every wish, but your core drivers cannot be underestimated. Take a look at our article on the right time to change jobs and this could help you decide whether this move is for you.

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Gameplay Programmer

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£30,000 - £50,000

Location:

Liverpool or Remote

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Permanent

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£20 - 30,000

£30 - 40,000

£40 - 50,000

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North West

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Gameplay Programmer

Programmer

UI Programmer

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This is a great opportunity to work for a small studio who are creating a range of amazing projects

Reference

8106

Expiry Date

04/04/2021

Will  Hudson

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Will Hudson
Will  Hudson

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Will Hudson
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Producer

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£35,000 - £55,000

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North East

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Permanent

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£30 - 40,000

£40 - 50,000

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North East

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Producer

Production

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This is a great opportunity to work for a studio who are creating amazing experiences.

Reference

7999

Expiry Date

31/03/2021

Will  Hudson

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Will Hudson
Will  Hudson

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UI Artist

Salary

£DoE + Relocation Assistance

Location:

Dundee or Remote

Job type

Permanent

Salary

£20 - 30,000

£30 - 40,000

£40 - 50,000

Location

Scotland

Specialisms

UI Artist

Description

This is an amazing opportunity to work with a studio who are creating top notch, mobile titles.

Reference

7995

Expiry Date

31/03/2021

Will  Hudson

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Will Hudson
Will  Hudson

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Amiqus heads to Interactive Futures
Amiqus heads to Interactive Futures

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Amiqus News

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16/02/2021

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We’re delighted to be involved in this week’s Interactive Futures  event – a celebration of the talent and creativity of video game studios within the Leamington Spa region. https://interactive-futures.com  Today (February 16th) sees the conference focus on the industry itself and our Business Manager Liz Prince is taking part in a panel session which looks at the Challenges and Opportunities facing UK Development in 2021. The rest of the week, the spotlight will switch to talent and careers in video games, with dedicated sessions lined up for students, schoolchildren and their parents. On Wednesday Liz will chair a panel on Why There’s A Career in Games for Everyone – Even if you don’t like maths or science. And on Thursday she will chair a panel which will uncover What Skills and Qualifications are required for a Career in Games. The video games sector in the Leamington Spa region is the second largest in the UK outside of London and Slough & Heathrow and is home to some of the most respected studios around the world, including Codemasters, Mediatonic, NaturalMotion, Playground Games, SEGA Hardlight, Sumo Digital and more, plus a huge number of indie studios. Interactive Futures is hosted by the Coventry & Warwickshire Local Enterprise Partnership, Warwickshire Country Council and Warwick District Council.

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Liz Prince

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Liz Prince

Liz Prince

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Liz Prince

Get Smart about PLAY

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Amiqus News

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25/02/2020

Summary

Ukie launches Get Smart about PLAY Get Smart about PLAY is a campaign that seeks to encourage parents and care givers to use tools on devices to help manage spend, screen time and access to content. The campaign, which is being fronted by former footballer and TV pundit Rio Ferdinand, will do so with the help of their PLAY code which stands for: P - Play with your kids.Understand what they play and why. L - Learn about family controls. Visit www.askaboutgames.com for simple guides. A - Ask what your kids think. Discuss ground rules before setting restrictions. Y - Set restrictions that work for your family. The aim of the campaign is to empower care givers to manage play in the way that works for their families, as well as demonstrating that as an industry we take our responsibility to all our players seriously. The campaign launched today and there will be activities running throughout the year. Visit www.askaboutgames.com to find out more.

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Ask Amiqus - What should I consider when employing a writer or narrative designer?

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Amiqus Toolkit

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28/11/2019

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.suzes-btn { width: auto; padding: 10px 7px; border: 2px solid #ec6b01; border-radius: 5px; background: #ec6b01; color: #ffff !important; font-family: 'Proxima Nova W01'; font-weight: 700; margin: 2px; display: inline-block; } .suzes-btn:hover { background: #ffff; color: #ec6b01 !important; } Whenever you’re hiring for a studio or project there are some staple considerations How long you will need someone for; what employment model is most cost-effective; what level of experience is necessary; or whether anyone in your existing team can step up to the plate to name a few. The recruitment of key hires will have an enormous impact on your game, and this is particularly true of writers and narrative designers. With this in mind, where should studios start when recruiting for the story-tellers? Decide what your game needs Phil Harris, Narrative Designer at Deep Silver FISHLABS told us “The first thing to consider is what your product really requires, as the roles of writer and narrative designer are quite different. Although often the difference in these roles is poorly defined within the industry. A writer creates text within a game world, which can range from the description a player reads when they click on an icon, to the flowing conversational dialogue between two characters, or the description of a vast fortress in the game. A narrative designer is a more specialized role, directly involved in the creation of the game world. They create the ‘machinery’ that makes the world working with the designers, artists, developers and producers to understand what is possible and how they can adapt their ideas to fit within the technical limitations of the game engine. They also maintain the canon of the product, so if the product is revisited, consistency is maintained.” Get the timing right Writers are often recruited after the start of product development, with freelance and remote working being common employment models. Narrative Designers on the other hand are typically needed from the initial inception of a product as they are integral to the creation of the game. Colin Harvey, Senior Narrative Designer at Rebellion agrees - “Ideally and most fundamentally, get the Narrative Designer in at the beginning of the project. That way he or she can help shape the project and make sure everything is suitably integrated from the get-go. If you don’t have existing processes for creating story, be prepared to let the Narrative Designer help establish those.” However, as any experienced game developer knows, unforeseen issues mean it’s often necessary to deviate from the plan. Though your game vision is a cornerstone of any project, Harvey has some advice should things go wrong. “If for whatever reason you absolutely have to bring a Narrative Designer in part way through the project, be prepared to be flexible with the overall vision. The Narrative Designer will do his or her best to stitch together what you’ve already got, but there’s got to be some give and take to make the vision the best it possibly can be.” Ensure team integration Being able to bring elements together is a key competency to look for when hiring and you’ll need to decide how you are going to assess candidates for these attributes. A good games recruitment agency can provide some guidance here. Freelance Narrative Designer, Anthony Jauneaud, believes that a person-spec as well as a skills list is key, he says "A writer on a video game project should be a people's person. They should be able to communicate with coders, artists, designers, producers... this is crucial. Narration is information, so they should be updated with changes. See narration as a binder for your games, but also for your team.". Competency-based interview questions around examples of where your Designer has deployed soft-skills, such as influence, will help you pull out the capability of your candidate. It’s also a good idea to take up references about their style and approach so that you can get beneath the surface and find out how they are likely to function in the job. What kind of project are you working on? Ultimately the kind of game you want to create will heavily inform your choice of hire. Experience in the genre or style you’re developing will mean a writer or designer has proven their ability in line with your vision. That said, many studios enjoy a totally fresh approach so it’s worth assessing personal portfolios in addition to formal work experience to find out what someone is capable of, some of which hasn’t yet been discovered. As Harvey at Rebellion points out, it’s possible to pitch for a share in an increasingly competitive leisure market by challenging the status quo and experimenting with new ideas. “If you own your own IP, be prepared to think radically about it – are there fundamental things that need to be changed to get it to work? If possible build in development time to test story ideas, do table read-throughs, etc. and see what works and what doesn’t. Contemporary gameplayers have justifiably high expectations of narrative and will expect plotting and characterisation to be on a par with what they see in the cinema and on Netflix.” This approach can allow you to open up your usual games recruitment patterns and think about hiring someone who will bring you new ideas you didn’t expect. Some final words Harris of Deep Silver FISHLABS emphasises the critical nature of making the right hire and summarises with some practical advice. “The real importance of narrative design is player engagement. If the world doesn’t work beneath the surface, the spell you hope the player is under can be broken. If you are considering a product that is a quick and simple puzzle game with some sparkling text to engage the players, you want a writer. But if you plan to produce a game with a stronger story element like a third person action adventure, an MMORPG, a multi-media launch, or a series, you should probably consider hiring a narrative designer. Or, if the product is big enough, both”. Finally, Rob Yescombe, acclaimed Writer & Narrative Director (RIME, FARPOINT, THE INVISIBLE HOURS) concludes. "Narrative is half science, half art. Don't hire a scientist without soul, and don't hire an Artiste who can't explain their methods." This article written by Amiqus was first published in Develop magazine Amiqus can help you Are you looking to make a new hire and want some more advice? We specialise in games recruitment and would love to help you find that next brilliant member to join your team - get in touch.  Or if you’re looking for an exciting new job in the games industry browse our latest jobs and apply today!  

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Liz Prince

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Liz Prince

Liz Prince

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Liz Prince