Relocation Guide

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Making games is a global phenomenon

Whether you’re a grad just starting out or a veteran industry professional, taking care of your career can often mean taking the step to change town, city or even country. The more open you are on location the broader the choice of role which enables you to pick the best move for your career. 

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Imagine

Google the location and picture the scene, choose a culture and design the lifestyle you want. Think about what you like to do both in and outside of work; would cool bars or relaxed café-culture be your thing? Art galleries or extreme sports? Urban chic or country air? Don’t forget the culture of the studio too. The right working environment can be hugely empowering.


Plan

Get practical and do some research. Logistics around living costs, travel, taxes, holidays, weather, accommodation etc. all add up. Review your finances to see how much you need to earn to support your lifestyle. Sometimes countries with the highest taxes and living costs actually offer the highest standards of living with benefits such as free lunches, great schools or long holidays, so take things on balance of what’s important to you.


Brave

Taking the plunge on relocation is a big step, but take the pressure off a little. Some people move towns or countries many times in their career, while others give it a go and then make their way back home when the time is right. It’s a matter of perspective but for most people, calling on a little bit of courage to make a change at least once in a working life brings a huge amount of growth, experience and fulfilment.

Talk

Who’s coming with you and who would you be leaving? Friends, kids, parents etc, it’s your decision of course but be cautious of springing surprises on people who will be directly affected by your move. Early discussions mean you can address things you might not have thought of and make for a smoother transition. 


Talk to your recruitment consultant too, chances are they have helped many people in exactly your position and have a strong understanding of what you’re going through. Pick their brains and get the benefit of this experience and get any concerns off your chest. They might even be able to put you in touch with others they have placed there.


Career

Ultimately, if you’re going to the trouble of moving it should benefit your career. With location unrestricted you get to decide freely which projects appeal to you, what role you’d be happiest in and where this move could take your career in the future. 


Talk to your consultant about your aspirations and be open about what you want in your next move. We can’t promise your every wish, but your core drivers cannot be underestimated. Take a look at our article on the right time to change jobs and this could help you decide whether this move is for you.

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jobs

Latest jobs

Localisation Vendor Manager

Salary

up to £35k DoE

Location:

Bedfordshire

Job type

Permanent

Salary

£30 - 40,000

Location

UK

Specialisms

QA & Test

Description

Amiqus have partnered with a pre-eminent, end-to-end, game services provider for the global gaming market to find a Localisation Vendor Manager to join them. Gaming is their passion and primary focus.

Reference

8198

Expiry Date

11/06/2021

Chloe O'Brien

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Chloe O'Brien
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Localisation Manager

Salary

£40-50k

Location:

Bedfordshire

Job type

Permanent

Salary

£30 - 40,000

£40 - 50,000

Location

England

Specialisms

QA & Test

Description

Amiqus have partnered with a pre-eminent, end-to-end, game services provider for the global gaming market to find a Localisation Manager to join them. Gaming is their passion and primary focus. They a

Reference

8199

Expiry Date

11/06/2021

Chloe O'Brien

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Chloe O'Brien
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Generalist Artist

Salary

£35,000 - £50,000

Location:

Guildford or Remote

Job type

Fixed Term

Permanent

Salary

£30 - 40,000

£40 - 50,000

£50 - 60,000

Location

Remote working

South East

Specialisms

Artist

Asset Artist

Character Artist

Environment Artist

Texture Artist

Material artist

Description

This is a fantastic opportunity to work with a studio who are creating amazing new experiences

Reference

8196

Expiry Date

11/06/2021

Will  Hudson

Author

Will Hudson
Will  Hudson

Author

Will Hudson
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