Hiring for Permanent Staff

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Recruitment but not as you know it.

Choosing Amiqus has great benefits – our friendly and experienced team know the industry inside out and understand what it takes to successfully deliver to technical, executive and strategic roles at all levels, locally and internationally.

Taking time to listen and get to know what our clients and candidates want means that we match brilliantly for the benefit of both parties. We want everyone to be committed and positive and thriving together as a team. For a more in depth look at our hiring process, click below. 



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Amiqus heads to Interactive Futures
Amiqus heads to Interactive Futures

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Amiqus News

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News

16/02/2021

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We’re delighted to be involved in this week’s Interactive Futures  event – a celebration of the talent and creativity of video game studios within the Leamington Spa region. https://interactive-futures.com  Today (February 16th) sees the conference focus on the industry itself and our Business Manager Liz Prince is taking part in a panel session which looks at the Challenges and Opportunities facing UK Development in 2021. The rest of the week, the spotlight will switch to talent and careers in video games, with dedicated sessions lined up for students, schoolchildren and their parents. On Wednesday Liz will chair a panel on Why There’s A Career in Games for Everyone – Even if you don’t like maths or science. And on Thursday she will chair a panel which will uncover What Skills and Qualifications are required for a Career in Games. The video games sector in the Leamington Spa region is the second largest in the UK outside of London and Slough & Heathrow and is home to some of the most respected studios around the world, including Codemasters, Mediatonic, NaturalMotion, Playground Games, SEGA Hardlight, Sumo Digital and more, plus a huge number of indie studios. Interactive Futures is hosted by the Coventry & Warwickshire Local Enterprise Partnership, Warwickshire Country Council and Warwick District Council.

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Get Smart about PLAY

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Amiqus News

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News

25/02/2020

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Ukie launches Get Smart about PLAY Get Smart about PLAY is a campaign that seeks to encourage parents and care givers to use tools on devices to help manage spend, screen time and access to content. The campaign, which is being fronted by former footballer and TV pundit Rio Ferdinand, will do so with the help of their PLAY code which stands for: P - Play with your kids.Understand what they play and why. L - Learn about family controls. Visit www.askaboutgames.com for simple guides. A - Ask what your kids think. Discuss ground rules before setting restrictions. Y - Set restrictions that work for your family. The aim of the campaign is to empower care givers to manage play in the way that works for their families, as well as demonstrating that as an industry we take our responsibility to all our players seriously. The campaign launched today and there will be activities running throughout the year. Visit www.askaboutgames.com to find out more.

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Ask Amiqus - What should I consider when employing a writer or narrative designer?

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Amiqus Toolkit

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28/11/2019

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.suzes-btn { width: auto; padding: 10px 7px; border: 2px solid #ec6b01; border-radius: 5px; background: #ec6b01; color: #ffff !important; font-family: 'Proxima Nova W01'; font-weight: 700; margin: 2px; display: inline-block; } .suzes-btn:hover { background: #ffff; color: #ec6b01 !important; } Whenever you’re hiring for a studio or project there are some staple considerations How long you will need someone for; what employment model is most cost-effective; what level of experience is necessary; or whether anyone in your existing team can step up to the plate to name a few. The recruitment of key hires will have an enormous impact on your game, and this is particularly true of writers and narrative designers. With this in mind, where should studios start when recruiting for the story-tellers? Decide what your game needs Phil Harris, Narrative Designer at Deep Silver FISHLABS told us “The first thing to consider is what your product really requires, as the roles of writer and narrative designer are quite different. Although often the difference in these roles is poorly defined within the industry. A writer creates text within a game world, which can range from the description a player reads when they click on an icon, to the flowing conversational dialogue between two characters, or the description of a vast fortress in the game. A narrative designer is a more specialized role, directly involved in the creation of the game world. They create the ‘machinery’ that makes the world working with the designers, artists, developers and producers to understand what is possible and how they can adapt their ideas to fit within the technical limitations of the game engine. They also maintain the canon of the product, so if the product is revisited, consistency is maintained.” Get the timing right Writers are often recruited after the start of product development, with freelance and remote working being common employment models. Narrative Designers on the other hand are typically needed from the initial inception of a product as they are integral to the creation of the game. Colin Harvey, Senior Narrative Designer at Rebellion agrees - “Ideally and most fundamentally, get the Narrative Designer in at the beginning of the project. That way he or she can help shape the project and make sure everything is suitably integrated from the get-go. If you don’t have existing processes for creating story, be prepared to let the Narrative Designer help establish those.” However, as any experienced game developer knows, unforeseen issues mean it’s often necessary to deviate from the plan. Though your game vision is a cornerstone of any project, Harvey has some advice should things go wrong. “If for whatever reason you absolutely have to bring a Narrative Designer in part way through the project, be prepared to be flexible with the overall vision. The Narrative Designer will do his or her best to stitch together what you’ve already got, but there’s got to be some give and take to make the vision the best it possibly can be.” Ensure team integration Being able to bring elements together is a key competency to look for when hiring and you’ll need to decide how you are going to assess candidates for these attributes. A good games recruitment agency can provide some guidance here. Freelance Narrative Designer, Anthony Jauneaud, believes that a person-spec as well as a skills list is key, he says "A writer on a video game project should be a people's person. They should be able to communicate with coders, artists, designers, producers... this is crucial. Narration is information, so they should be updated with changes. See narration as a binder for your games, but also for your team.". Competency-based interview questions around examples of where your Designer has deployed soft-skills, such as influence, will help you pull out the capability of your candidate. It’s also a good idea to take up references about their style and approach so that you can get beneath the surface and find out how they are likely to function in the job. What kind of project are you working on? Ultimately the kind of game you want to create will heavily inform your choice of hire. Experience in the genre or style you’re developing will mean a writer or designer has proven their ability in line with your vision. That said, many studios enjoy a totally fresh approach so it’s worth assessing personal portfolios in addition to formal work experience to find out what someone is capable of, some of which hasn’t yet been discovered. As Harvey at Rebellion points out, it’s possible to pitch for a share in an increasingly competitive leisure market by challenging the status quo and experimenting with new ideas. “If you own your own IP, be prepared to think radically about it – are there fundamental things that need to be changed to get it to work? If possible build in development time to test story ideas, do table read-throughs, etc. and see what works and what doesn’t. Contemporary gameplayers have justifiably high expectations of narrative and will expect plotting and characterisation to be on a par with what they see in the cinema and on Netflix.” This approach can allow you to open up your usual games recruitment patterns and think about hiring someone who will bring you new ideas you didn’t expect. Some final words Harris of Deep Silver FISHLABS emphasises the critical nature of making the right hire and summarises with some practical advice. “The real importance of narrative design is player engagement. If the world doesn’t work beneath the surface, the spell you hope the player is under can be broken. If you are considering a product that is a quick and simple puzzle game with some sparkling text to engage the players, you want a writer. But if you plan to produce a game with a stronger story element like a third person action adventure, an MMORPG, a multi-media launch, or a series, you should probably consider hiring a narrative designer. Or, if the product is big enough, both”. Finally, Rob Yescombe, acclaimed Writer & Narrative Director (RIME, FARPOINT, THE INVISIBLE HOURS) concludes. "Narrative is half science, half art. Don't hire a scientist without soul, and don't hire an Artiste who can't explain their methods." This article written by Amiqus was first published in Develop magazine Amiqus can help you Are you looking to make a new hire and want some more advice? We specialise in games recruitment and would love to help you find that next brilliant member to join your team - get in touch.  Or if you’re looking for an exciting new job in the games industry browse our latest jobs and apply today!  

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Ask Amiqus: Most attractive programme languages

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Amiqus News

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Blog

09/10/2019

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"I work with at least two different languages in my current studio, but more and more I'm feeling I would need to learn more to make the next step in my career." If creativity is the beating heart of the games industry, then technology is its lifeblood and the ability to code continues to be a mainstay of the most desirable skills when a games studio is looking to hire. Without the contribution of the programmers there is no game, so from the array of software options what are some of the most desirable languages game developers choose and why? Even as we move through the fourth decade of games software development, the number one skill continues to be the 35+ year old language of C++. The majority of console and PC games still fundamentally rely on C++ and critically it underpins the most complex and demanding game engines available, such as Unreal. “Basically, nothing that can handle complexity runs as fast as C++” says Bjarne Stroustrup, creator of C++ back in 1979. Why has it not been usurped since then? Arguably the results that can be achieved with C++ have never been bettered.  One of the beauties of C++ is that it is flexible, enabling you to write additional features in to an existing engine, game or tool-set at the lowest level. This provides the flexibility of a high-level language with the power, efficiency and level of control more associated with low-level languages such as assembly. As a core object oriented language, C++ has the power to apply hugely complex programming demands balanced with more efficiency and speed than any other high-level OOP language out there. It’s a win-win and these features make developers with C++ skills enormously attractive to hire.  The power of C++ is not without price and mastery is highly aspirational If you’re not familiar with it, getting started in C++ can seem like an uphill climb - the power of C++ is not without price and mastery is highly aspirational. When making career choices it’s worth bearing in mind that some languages are easier than others.  Being so intricate it’s challenging, no low-level systems are handled for you and the kaleidoscope of possibilities means precision is key. One benefit of learning C++ however is that many other languages follow similar principles, so once these skills are mastered transferring skills to other languages can feel much easier. C++ is not alone however, C# has continued to rise in demand from employers. Born of the same object oriented principles, inspired by the C and C++ family tree, C# began as Microsoft’s simple, modern, general purpose language for the .Net framework. When it comes to online and cloud technology, the presence of C++ and C# are pretty evenly matched, with the likes of Microsoft Azure utilising the agility and speed of its home language C#. Over the last few years demand for C# has grown exponentially as the basis of the Unity game engine. Unity combines the power to create games and critically, to take them cross-platform, uniting game development for PC, consoles, mobile devices and websites alike. You can play, preview, edit, test and debug your game with rapid iteration, and this comprehensive list of features makes Unity very attractive to game developers. It is capable of creating physically-based visual features with rich and immersive visual content and although it is yet to match the full power of C++, C# within Unity has become extremely attractive when hiring today. Not least because it is still relatively new so experienced developers are harder to find.  Python has gained momentum because of its universality across staple tools and packages such as Max, Maya and Blender. It’s lighter and more readable syntax makes it much easier to pick up than the deeper languages and nimble scalability increases its usefulness for large and small scale development. Different developers will be attracted to different skills depending on their choices of mobile strategy Alongside the demand for cross-platform skills we also see studios opting for native mobile development specific to a given mobile platform, primarily Objective C for iOS and Java for Android. Native development requires unique expertise for that device and the benefit is that the full potential of the platform can be reached, driving greater user experience through larger and faster capabilities. On the non-native side, also attractive in mobile, are HTML5 skills for apps using standard web technologies which creates cross-platform mobile applications that work on multiple devices. These hybrid apps and games using an SDK are typically cheaper and faster to create than native. Different developers will be attracted to different skills depending on their choices of mobile strategy, so there isn’t a one-size-fits-all. As you might expect from the aforementioned, C++ can also be utilised for mobile development. This is a common denominator enabling reuse of core code to port across platforms. Due to the high skills demanded within the industry getting in at entry-level can be a challenge and it’s no secret that software development requires a rigorous set of competencies. Most developers look for graduates with at least a 2:1 or a 1st Class degree and the deeper and more mathematical the computing aspect the higher the demand. However a good piece of advice is to keep focused on your capabilities and play not only to your strengths, but also what you enjoy. Experience and demonstration is always of huge value to the industry with or without a degree and cross training into new languages can make you more widely desirable, in particular within a smaller studio where the variety of tasks can be greater. The alternative to generalist skills is to consider not only your languages of choice but also a programming specialism.  If in your current role you are already working with one of the most in-demand programming languages our advice is to keep evolving techniques, share your ideas and learn from other developers in the games community. There's nothing to stop you from learning other languages in your spare time and knowing the emerging languages in the industry will help to keep you current. If you’re worried about not having the most desirable skills then it’s up to you to ask for some training, to learn what you can to produce personal projects that demonstrate you can cross into other languages with ease. The key is to always stay open-minded to learning new things and to keep in touch with what’s going on in the wider industry as well as what’s happening within your own studio. Are you interested in learning new languages in a programmer job? Amiqus are experts in games recruitment and we want to use our industry knowledge to help you find a role that you love, whether that's in programming, animation or art. If our current jobs aren't exactly what you're looking for then sign up to our job alerts. Browse jobs by skill: C# jobs C++ jobs Core Tech Programmer jobs Engine Programmer jobs Gameplay Programmer jobs Graphics Programmer jobs UI Programmer jobs

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Ask Amiqus - VR and AR

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Blogs

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News

07/10/2019

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.suzes-btn { width: auto; padding: 10px 7px; border: 2px solid #ec6b01; border-radius: 5px; background: #ec6b01; color: #ffff !important; font-family: 'Proxima Nova W01'; font-weight: 700; margin: 2px; display: inline-block; } .suzes-btn:hover { background: #ffff; color: #ec6b01 !important; } What special skills do employers look for when hiring for roles on VR projects and how risky is it to skill up in those areas considering the longevity of VR is still unknown? The global VR & AR market was valued at around $3 billion in 2016 and in just one year it grew to $7 billion. The demand for VR & AR skills has followed this upward trend and will continue to as the industry grows to a projected of value of $92 billion by 2025. There is an entrepreneurial spirit in the space with many industry vets channelling their experience into setting up new VR & AR ventures. VR has been on the scene longer than AR but there is space for both to exist. A UK study found that 50% of respondents thought owning a VR device was fairly or very appealing. A virtual reality headset presents many uses – training for the military, treating PTSD, and helping sportsmen and women refine their techniques. And the needs that VR cannot meet are where AR comes in. With the ability to overlay virtual objects on the real-world environment, augmented reality has strong prospects for meeting navigation needs and propelling immersive learning in the classroom. On the surface of it, new skills do not appear necessary, core VR code- base is built on the most in-demand areas such as C+, C# and Unity. Art assets and environments created using Physics Based Rendering are also not unique to VR, but we are now seeing demand for candidates who have gained VR experience, either through employment or at University. Employers are starting to look for the context of deployment rather than skills alone – so effectively VR itself is becoming a skill. It’s early days and many specialist abilities needed to address the unique challenges of VR are still in formation. So what are employers looking for when hiring for gameplay jobs today?   PROBLEM SOLVING   A key ingredient is problem solving skills. Candidates with a leaning toward methodical, mathematical or experimental thought processes are of great interest to studios facing new challenges. The enhanced physicality of the gameplay interaction and multitude of visual configurations makes rendering images without blurring a major challenge. Achieving sufficient speed for a seamless VR experience increases demand both from an artistic and a technical perspective and optimising the efficiency of the code base is of critical importance. These features point to an evolving trend that the disciplines of creative and tech are growing closer together when it comes to VR. This new level of granularity in the interdependence of image and code has led to employers demanding stronger visual evidence in portfolios when hiring. Programming jobseekers can typically evidence their skills by showing source code excerpts, however when it comes to VR, studios want to see the impact of the code on the in-game visuals. On the art side, managers not only want to see the right quality models and artwork but how artists have technically integrated their assets into the game engine. Portfolios need to be comprehensive enough to demonstrate these fully rounded skills, showing an understanding of how they will cope with the additional demands of VR.   SENSE SHIFTING   As a game experience becomes more immersive, so the role of the senses shifts from the everyday. The VR headset reframes vision and removes real world touch so that the compensatory instincts kick in, particularly hearing. This means that audio, which has always played a key role in games, has an even deeper level of contribution to make to the VR experience. We have seen an increase in the demand for audio programmers in particular. Now that a player can turn toward or away from the source of a sound, the impact of even the smallest nuance in ambient sound will play a major role in sustaining the level of immersion. Once again a solid portfolio and showreel should demonstrate the level of detail and finesse VR requires and hirers seek standards above the ordinary. Another focus area is UI skills. The traditional thumb oriented handset is not available in VR and while this rewrites the design rulebook on menu access and selections, user interaction requires a higher level of intuitiveness to avoid confusion. Getting lost in virtual menus or physically knocking things over in reality is a no-no. Gameplay interactions have a new dimension of consequence – in fact pretty much every consideration in a ‘2D’ game is amplified exponentially in VR. To a large extent, the level of specialism a hirer is looking for depends on the size of the studio and what scope of project they’re working on. Some are looking for knowledge of a specific headset, others are happy with art or coding generalists, and some need the aforementioned tech- creative hybrid to bridge the two.   DURABILITY OF VR   One of the threats to growth that have been levelled at VR is that the level of immersion could potentially cut-out any interactions beyond the headset, making the VR experience an engaging but lonely pursuit. This has already been countered by the likes of vTime, developer of a VR social network that allows anyone, anywhere to spend quality time with family and friends in virtual reality. For vTime, VR has social connection at the core, aiming for participants to enhance people’s experiences of their relationships. In recent years the market has seen a continued rise in demand for VR skills both in and outside of games. This is reflected in the growth in VR titles being brought to market, but it’s worth noting that this has been a steady stream of releases rather than an explosion. Whatever the reason, if there is no ‘bubble’ to burst and market confidence grows gradually, the outlook from the commercial bedrock of VR looks strong. There is an entrepreneurial spirit in the space with many industry veterans channeling their experience into setting up new VR ventures. Despite the inevitable naysayers it remains an exciting, innovative space for a career in games.   FIND A GAMES PROGRAMMER ROLE WITH AMIQUS   Do you have a passion for games development? Whether you’re currently working in the industry or are curious about where a job in games development could take you, we’re here to help. Take a look at our latest job vacancies or sign up to receive personalised job alerts so that you don’t miss out on any of our great opportunities. 

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VR gamer playing archery game
Ask Amiqus - VR & AR

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Amiqus Toolkit

Content Type

Blog

07/10/2019

Summary

What special skills do employers look for when hiring for roles on VR projects and how risky is it to skill up in those areas considering the longevity of VR is still unknown? The global VR & AR market was valued at around $3 billion in 2016 and in just one year it grew to $7 billion. The demand for VR & AR skills has followed this upward trend and will continue to as the industry grows to a projected of value of $92 billion by 2025. There is an entrepreneurial spirit in the space with many industry vets channelling their experience into setting up new VR & AR ventures. VR has been on the scene longer than AR but there is space for both to exist. A UK study found that 50% of respondents thought owning a VR device was fairly or very appealing. A virtual reality headset presents many uses – training for the military, treating PTSD, and helping sportsmen and women refine their techniques. And the needs that VR cannot meet are where AR comes in. With the ability to overlay virtual objects on the real-world environment, augmented reality has strong prospects for meeting navigation needs and propelling immersive learning in the classroom. On the surface of it, new skills do not appear necessary, core VR code- base is built on the most in-demand areas such as C+, C# and Unity. Art assets and environments created using Physics Based Rendering are also not unique to VR, but we are now seeing demand for candidates who have gained VR experience, either through employment or at University. Employers are starting to look for the context of deployment rather than skills alone – so effectively VR itself is becoming a skill. It’s early days and many specialist abilities needed to address the unique challenges of VR are still in formation. So what are employers looking for when hiring for gameplay jobs today? PROBLEM SOLVING A key ingredient is problem solving skills. Candidates with a leaning toward methodical, mathematical or experimental thought processes are of great interest to studios facing new challenges. The enhanced physicality of the gameplay interaction and multitude of visual configurations makes rendering images without blurring a major challenge. Achieving sufficient speed for a seamless VR experience increases demand both from an artistic and a technical perspective and optimising the efficiency of the code base is of critical importance. These features point to an evolving trend that the disciplines of creative and tech are growing closer together when it comes to VR. This new level of granularity in the interdependence of image and code has led to employers demanding stronger visual evidence in portfolios when hiring. Programming jobseekers can typically evidence their skills by showing source code excerpts, however when it comes to VR, studios want to see the impact of the code on the in-game visuals. On the art side, managers not only want to see the right quality models and artwork but how artists have technically integrated their assets into the game engine. Portfolios need to be comprehensive enough to demonstrate these fully rounded skills, showing an understanding of how they will cope with the additional demands of VR. SENSE SHIFTING As a game experience becomes more immersive, so the role of the senses shifts from the everyday. The VR headset reframes vision and removes real world touch so that the compensatory instincts kick in, particularly hearing. This means that audio, which has always played a key role in games, has an even deeper level of contribution to make to the VR experience. We have seen an increase in the demand for audio programmers in particular. Now that a player can turn toward or away from the source of a sound, the impact of even the smallest nuance in ambient sound will play a major role in sustaining the level of immersion. Once again a solid portfolio and showreel should demonstrate the level of detail and finesse VR requires and hirers seek standards above the ordinary. Another focus area is UI skills. The traditional thumb oriented handset is not available in VR and while this rewrites the design rulebook on menu access and selections, user interaction requires a higher level of intuitiveness to avoid confusion. Getting lost in virtual menus or physically knocking things over in reality is a no-no. Gameplay interactions have a new dimension of consequence – in fact pretty much every consideration in a ‘2D’ game is amplified exponentially in VR. To a large extent, the level of specialism a hirer is looking for depends on the size of the studio and what scope of project they’re working on. Some are looking for knowledge of a specific headset, others are happy with art or coding generalists, and some need the aforementioned tech- creative hybrid to bridge the two. DURABILITY OF VR One of the threats to growth that have been levelled at VR is that the level of immersion could potentially cut-out any interactions beyond the headset, making the VR experience an engaging but lonely pursuit. This has already been countered by the likes of vTime, developer of a VR social network that allows anyone, anywhere to spend quality time with family and friends in virtual reality. For vTime, VR has social connection at the core, aiming for participants to enhance people’s experiences of their relationships. In recent years the market has seen a continued rise in demand for VR skills both in and outside of games. This is reflected in the growth in VR titles being brought to market, but it’s worth noting that this has been a steady stream of releases rather than an explosion. Whatever the reason, if there is no ‘bubble’ to burst and market confidence grows gradually, the outlook from the commercial bedrock of VR looks strong. There is an entrepreneurial spirit in the space with many industry veterans channeling their experience into setting up new VR ventures. Despite the inevitable naysayers it remains an exciting, innovative space for a career in games. FIND A GAMES PROGRAMMER ROLE WITH AMIQUS Do you have a passion for games development? Whether you’re currently working in the industry or are curious about where a job in games development could take you, we’re here to help. Take a look at our latest job vacancies or sign up to receive personalised job alerts so that you don’t miss out on any of our great opportunities. Browse job by skill: C# jobs C++ jobs Core Tech Programmer jobs Engine Programmer jobs Gameplay Programmer jobs Graphics Programmer jobs UI Programmer jobs

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Come and chat to us at the REDI to Game Mixer at Develop:Brighton

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Amiqus News

Content Type

News

05/07/2019

Summary

An exciting diversity mixer is taking place at Develop:Brighton REDI to Game Mixer is an opportunity to celebrate and promote all the Representation, Equality, Diversity and Inclusion initiatives from various diversity groups, internal studio initiatives and charities working with the video games industry. Liz Prince will be there representing Amiqus so make sure you come along and say hello. The REDI to Game Mixer will be held on Wednesday 10th July, 3pm-5pm at the Hilton Brighton Metropole.  The REDI to Game Mixer will be a chance for industry professionals to meet organisations working in this space and share their much needed insight about how games development can be more diverse and inclusive, better representing the gamers we all create content for. There is so much amazing work being done by the various diversity groups, internal studio initiatives and charities to champion the EDI principles. REDI to Game Mixer aims to celebrate, promote and champion these groups, as well as encourage knowledge and skill sharing which will not only improve the industry, but also help it pillar another beacon of inclusion and diversity across the sector. Attendees will be invited to take part in various conversations hosted by a range of groups and organisations. They will also be asked to take part in the ‘Start - Stop - Continue Wall’, where people can post what behaviours need to be started, stopped and continued regarding REDI issues.  These outcomes will provide solid, tangible evidence of good and bad practice which can be fed back to the industry to help embed REDI principles every day, because if you stay REDI, you don’t have to get REDI! Everyone who works in the industry is invited to join the conversation at the REDI to Game Mixer any time between 3pm and 5pm on Wednesday 10th July. The Mixer is being held on the floor above the expo area in the Hilton Brighton Metropole and free refreshments will be provided. Please note that anyone wishing to attend will need to register for a FREE Develop:Brighton Expo Pass.   

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Let’s Celebrate the Game-Changers

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Amiqus News

Content Type

News

11/10/2018

Summary

How can we help drive positive change in the gaming industry? One sure-fire way is to showcase the companies leading the way when it comes to employer excellence.That’s why, at Amiqus, we’re extremely proud to be putting our weight behind one of the biggest best practice events in the industry, as headline sponsor of the 2018 Best Places to Work Awards. This year’s event promises to be bigger and better than ever and will celebrate everything the gaming sector is doing right when it comes to diversity, corporate social responsibility, leadership, training and employee wellbeing. We need to be shouting about these things and Best Places provides us with the perfect platform. Far more than just an awards ceremony, the Best Places to Work event is focused on enabling improvement and sharing the success formulas of exemplar companies, so that others can learn from them and become better employers. Winners receive a prestigious Best Places badge but runners-up benefit too – they can access a free report on any issues picked up during the judging process, to aid development and improvement. Events like Best Places to Work shine a vital spotlight on our industry – illuminating the incredible work many in the sector are doing to enhance the employee experience. This year’s awards ceremony takes place on Friday, October 12th in London and anyone who’s serious about attracting and retaining talent will be there. Besides anything else, it’s a fantastic opportunity to network. So let’s get together and celebrate the game-changers – because their success is helping the industry thrive.

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TIGA Awards finalist 2018 logo
WE’RE TIGA AWARDS FINALISTS – IN 4 CATEGORIES – WHAT A YEAR!

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Amiqus News

Content Type

News

05/10/2018

Summary

We are delighted to have been included as finalists in four of the TIGA Awards categories this year – Best Recruitment Agency, Best Education Initiative & Talent Development, Best Services Provider and the Diversity Award. It’s super exciting to be recognised for not only our core recruitment business but for the pro bono work we’re giving back to the industry. We are incredibly grateful to everyone at TIGA, and the judging panel, for considering us for these shortlist places. It’s such an endorsement of the fantastic team we have here at Amiqus, I can’t thank them enough for making our business what it is, and to our clients for their fantastic support. 2018 has been an incredible year for us so far, with a big focus on our G Into Gaming campaign, aimed at addressing the gender imbalance in the games development sector, where just 20 per cent of staff are women. The initiative has seen us actively target female programmers outside of the industry via a high profile and super-targeted LinkedIn campaign. Promoting video games as a fun, but inclusive, industry sector. We’ve already seen strong results from this work but there’s more to do!Elsewhere, we continue to support early career development and education, speaking to undergrads on relevant courses about how to present themselves to employers, how to demonstrate their portfolios and more. We are again speaking at Staffordshire University and Abertay University next month, providing free advice and guidance to students. It’s great to meet the future of the industry.We’re looking forward to seeing everyone at the TIGA Awards on 1st November. Good luck to everyone who’s been nominated – such fantastic talent. We’ll raise a glass with you all!

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